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Dr Ian Player

IanThe late Dr Ian Player was one of the world’s most outstanding conservationists and environmental statesmen. Born in South Africa in 1927, he "earned his stripes" in the transitional era during which Africa’s protected areas were being created and tested. It was with great sadness that we mourned the passing of our founder, Dr Player on 30 November 2014. Despite physical challenges that hounded him all his life, Ian worked tirelessly until his last day, fully committed to his life’s work of nature conservation and his quest to understand the human spirit and psyche.

It was heartening to read all the messages that poured in from all corners of the earth, confirming just what an effect Ian had and how one individual impacted on so many others. The memorial service for Dr Ian Player was held on 14 January 2015 at Hilton College in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands, attended by friends, family and colleagues from all over the world.

Ian’s legacy is without parallel, his example without equal. His approach to conservation highlighted the importance of the spiritual as well as the scientific side of environmental impact. He maintained that people and culture are a vital element in the environmental equation.

Conservation Pioneer and Legend, Dr Ian Player

Ian Cedric Audley Player was born on 15 March 1927, in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Educated at St. John’s College, he went on to serve in the SADF - 6th South African Armoured Division attached to the American 5th Army, in Italy 1944 – 1945.

A globally recognised conservation legend, Dr Ian Player was a pioneer, a visionary and an activist who has profoundly influenced conservation and changed the lives of countless people. He grew up in the pioneering days of nature conservation in Africa, working for months on end in the wilderness.

His sporting passion was canoeing. After initiating the Pietermaritzburg to Durban Canoe Marathon (Dusi), he went on to win the race three times. His exploits are well documented in his book Men, Rivers and Canoes.

On his return from WWII he worked underground in the gold mines before taking a position in the (then) Natal Parks Board. He rose to the rank of Chief Conservator of Zululand by the time he took early retirement, in 1974. He was made a member of the Board on three occasions, the only Parks Board staff member to do so. Later in life he also served on the Board of SanParks (SA National Parks Board).

His list of awards is extensive, ranging from Knight in the Order of the Golden Ark (Holland), a decoration for Meritorious Service (Republic of South Africa civilian award) through to Doctor of Philosophy, Honoris causa – Natal University, South Africa, 1984 and Doctor of Laws (LLD) Honoris causa – Rhodes University, South Africa, 2003.

From 1952, as Warden of the iMfolozi Game Reserve, Dr Player spearheaded two important and far-reaching initiatives. The first was Operation Rhino, in which he led the team that pioneered the methods and drugs to immobilize and translocate large mammals. The team captured and moved many of the remaining population of southern white rhino to save them from the brink of extinction. As a direct result, white rhinos now inhabit their former distribution range within many national parks and game reserves, private game farms, zoos and parks around the world.

The second initiative was Dr Player’s recognition of the value of wilderness for the human spirit and for biodiversity conservation. Professionally, this led to the designation of the iMfolozi and St. Lucia Wilderness Areas in the late 1950s -- the first wilderness areas to be zoned in South Africa and on the African continent. It also fired his personal quest to understand the human psyche through dreams and drawing on the work of Swiss analyst Carl Jung, which he explored assiduously for decades with the late Sir Laurens van der Post. Dr Player was one of the founding forces for the Cape Town Centre for Applied Jungian Studies, the first such centre in Africa.

Dr Player resigned from the Natal Parks Board (NPB) to focus his energies on the wilderness movement. He continued conservation work within the NGO sector, leading to one of his most notable achievements - the founding of the globally recognised Wilderness Leadership School (WLS). The WLS was the nucleus from which many other collaborative organisations have emerged, including the World Wilderness Congress (WWC) -- implemented by Vance Martin and the WILD Foundation on behalf of the Wilderness Network -- held every four years in various countries throughout the world.

Ian Player was also the founding force of the Wilderness Foundation (Africa) Wilderness Foundation (UK), The WILD Foundation (based in the USA and working globally), and the Magqubu Ntombela Memorial Foundation (in honour of his friend, colleague, and mentor). Under the auspices of Andrew Muir, who worked alongside and was mentored by Ian Player, the Wilderness Foundation SA has become one of the major conservation organisations in southern Africa.

Until very recently, Ian Player continued to serve on the Boards of these organisations that today play a significant role in conservation in Africa and globally. Despite life-long physical challenges that steadily increased with age, he nonetheless worked tirelessly on his life’s work for wild nature.

Ian Player has written many books of which White Rhino Saga and Zululand Wilderness Shadow and Soul are probably best known. His biography Into the River of Life was published towards the end of 2013.

Ian Player committed his life to conservation and, in particular, to the preservation of the rhino through his services as a consultant to many organisations sharing this common interest.

Dr Ian Player's tribute to Magqubu Ntombela

Ian2"During my 40 years’ involvement with conservation I have met many remarkable people ranging from princes to scientists and political leaders. But my beloved friend, mentor and wilderness guide Magqubu Ntombela was unique. He taught me the real meaning of hlonipha (respect) and ubuntu (compassion).

Through the most patient instruction he introduced me to a new cosmology. We worked together capturing rhino; he was with me as I crept up and fired the dart gun from very close range. On long patrols fighting poaching gangs and talking to recalcitrant law-breakers Magqubu was always at my side.

Coming as he did from a long line of warriors, he was afraid of nothing. His grandfather had served Shaka Zulu and his father fought in Cetshwayo’s Zulu army at the great battle of Isandlwana in 1897 with the Ngobamakosi regiment. Our early friendship grew out of that war because my grandfather in the Natal Hussars fought at Inyezane on the same day as Magqubu’s father was fighting at Isandlwana. Together in 1987 we made a pilgrimage to Brecon to the headquarters of the Royal Regiment of Wales, where we were entertained by the colonel and his officers."

A Tribute to Dr Ian Player

In April 2015, the International Journal of Wilderness published a tribute to Dr Ian Player. Follow the link below to download a copy of the publication.

Wilderness

By Dr Ian McCallum

Have we forgotten
that wilderness is not a place,
but a pattern of soul
where every tree, every bird and beast
is a soul maker?

Have we forgotten
that wilderness is not a place
but a moving feast of stars,
footprints, scales and beginnings?

Since when
did we become afraid of the night
and that only the bright starts count?
or that our moon is not a moon
unless it is full?

By whose command
Were the animals
through groping fingers,
one for each hand,
reduced to the big and little fives?

Have we forgotten
that every creature is within us
carried by tides
of earthly blood
and that we named them?

Have we forgotten
that wilderness is not a place,
but a season
And that we are in its
final hour?

The Legacy of Dr Ian Player